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0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Case 23% Improvement Relative Risk Case (b) 23% c19early.org/sun Ma et al. Sunlight for COVID-19 Prophylaxis Favors sun exposure Favors control
Associations between predicted vitamin D status, vitamin D intake, and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and Coronavirus Disease 2019 severity
Ma et al., The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, doi:10.1093/ajcn/nqab389
Ma et al., Associations between predicted vitamin D status, vitamin D intake, and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and.., The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, doi:10.1093/ajcn/nqab389
Dec 2021   Source   PDF  
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Analysis of 39,915 patients with 1,768 COVID+ cases based on surveys in the Nurses' Health Study II, showing higher UVA/UVB exposure associated with lower risk of COVID-19 cases.
risk of case, 23.0% lower, RR 0.77, p < 0.001, higher sunlight exposure 411 of 10,393 (4.0%), lower sunlight exposure 495 of 9,142 (5.4%), NNT 68, adjusted per study, odds ratio converted to relative risk, UVB, highest quartile vs. lowest quartile, model 3, table 3, multivariable.
risk of case, 23.1% lower, RR 0.77, p < 0.001, higher sunlight exposure 325 of 9,325 (3.5%), lower sunlight exposure 436 of 9,079 (4.8%), NNT 76, adjusted per study, odds ratio converted to relative risk, UVA, highest quartile vs. lowest quartile, model 3, table 3, multivariable.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Ma et al., 3 Dec 2021, retrospective, USA, peer-reviewed, 16 authors, study period May 2020 - March 2021.
Contact: achan@mgh.harvard.edu.
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Abstract: Associations between predicted vitamin D status, vitamin D intake, and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and Coronavirus Disease 2019 severity ED IT ED M A N U SC RI PT Affiliations: 1 Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 2 Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 3 Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 4 Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 5 Diabetes Unit and Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 6 Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 7 Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 8 Division of Women’s Health, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 9 Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 10 Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 11 Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 12 Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA # Contributed equally to this work. N Short title: Vitamin D and COVID-19 IN A L U Funding: This work was supported by grants U01 CA176726 and U01 HL145386 from the National Institutes of Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Dean’s Fund for Scientific Advancement: Acceleration Award, Massachusetts Consortium on Pathogen Readiness COVID-19 Response Fund Award, and a Stuart and Suzanne Steele MGH Research Scholar Award. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, interpretation of data, writing of the report, and decision to submit the paper for publication. O RI G Acknowledgements: We would like to thank the participants and staff of the Nurses’ Health Study II. WM, SNB, and ATC designed research; WM conducted the data analysis; WM, SNB, and ATC wrote the paper; ATC had primary responsibility for final content. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. The authors declare no conflicts of interests. © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Nutrition. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com Authors: Wenjie Ma, ScD1,2, Long H. Nguyen, MD, MS1,2, Yiyang Yue, MS3, Ming Ding, ScD3, David A. Drew, PhD1,2, Kai Wang, MD, PhD4, Jordi Merino, PhD5,6,7, Janet W. Rich-Edwards, ScD4,8, Qi Sun, MD, ScD3,4,8, Carlos A. Camargo Jr., MD, DrPH4,9,10, Edward Giovannucci, MD, ScD3,4,9, Walter Willett, MD, DrPH3,4,9, JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH4,11, Mingyang Song, MD, ScD1,2,3,4, Shilpa N. Bhupathiraju, PhD3,9#, Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH1,2,4,9# Data sharing: Data described in the manuscript, code book, and analytic code will be made available upon request pending application and approval. Further information including the procedures to obtain and access data is described at https://www.nurseshealthstudy.org/researchers. PT Corresponding author: Dr. Andrew T. Chan, Clinical and..
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