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All Studies   Meta Analysis   Recent:  
0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Mortality 61% Improvement Relative Risk ICU admission 56% Progression 59% c19early.org/v Ong et al. Sotrovimab for COVID-19 EARLY TREATMENT Is early treatment with sotrovimab beneficial for COVID-19? Retrospective 94 patients in Singapore Lower progression with sotrovimab (p=0.047) Ong et al., Antibiotics, doi:10.3390/antibiotics11030345 Favors sotrovimab Favors control
Real-World Use of Sotrovimab for Pre-Emptive Treatment in High-Risk Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study
Ong et al., Antibiotics, doi:10.3390/antibiotics11030345
Ong et al., Real-World Use of Sotrovimab for Pre-Emptive Treatment in High-Risk Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients: An.., Antibiotics, doi:10.3390/antibiotics11030345
Mar 2022   Source   PDF  
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Retrospective 19 sotrovimab patients and 75 controls is Singapore, showing lower progression with treatment.
Efficacy is variant dependent. In Vitro studies predict lower efficacy for BA.1 [Liu, Sheward, VanBlargan] and a lack of efficacy for BA.2 [Zhou]. US EUA has been revoked.
risk of death, 60.5% lower, RR 0.39, p = 0.45, treatment 1 of 19 (5.3%), control 10 of 75 (13.3%), NNT 12.
risk of ICU admission, 56.1% lower, RR 0.44, p = 0.35, treatment 2 of 19 (10.5%), control 18 of 75 (24.0%), NNT 7.4.
risk of progression, 59.0% lower, HR 0.41, p = 0.047, treatment 19, control 75, Cox proportional hazards.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Ong et al., 5 Mar 2022, retrospective, Singapore, peer-reviewed, 10 authors, average treatment delay 2.0 days.
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Abstract: antibiotics Article Real-World Use of Sotrovimab for Pre-Emptive Treatment in High-Risk Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study Sean W. X. Ong 1,2 , Dongdong Ren 1,2 , Pei Hua Lee 1,2 , Stephanie Sutjipto 1,2 , Christopher Dugan 1,2 , Bo Yan Khoo 1,2 , Jun Xin Tay 1 , Shawn Vasoo 1,2,3 , Barnaby E. Young 1,2,3 and David C. Lye 1,2,3,4, * 1 2 3 4 *   Citation: Ong, S.W.X.; Ren, D.; Lee, P.H.; Sutjipto, S.; Dugan, C.; Khoo, B.Y.; Tay, J.X.; Vasoo, S.; Young, B.E.; Lye, D.C. Real-World Use of Sotrovimab for Pre-Emptive Treatment in High-Risk Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study. Antibiotics 2022, 11, 345. https:// doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11030345 Academic Editors: Eleonora Nicolai National Centre for Infectious Diseases, 16 Jln Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308442, Singapore; sean.ongwx@mohh.com.sg (S.W.X.O.); dongdong.ren@mohh.com.sg (D.R.); peihua.lee@mohh.com.sg (P.H.L.); stephanie.sutjipto@mohh.com.sg (S.S.); christopher_dugan@ttsh.com.sg (C.D.); boyan.khoo@mohh.com.sg (B.Y.K.); jun_xin_tay@ncid.sg (J.X.T.); shawn_vasoo@ncid.sg (S.V.); barnaby_young@ncid.sg (B.E.Y.) Department of Infectious Diseases, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore 308433, Singapore Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 308232, Singapore Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore Correspondence: david_lye@ncid.sg; Tel.: +65-6357-7457 Abstract: Data on use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in hospitalized patients are limited. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the use of mAbs for early treatment of unvaccinated hospitalized patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19. All inpatients at our center were screened on 27 October 2021. Primary outcome was in-hospital deterioration as defined by a composite of oxygen requirement, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, or mortality within 28 days of admission. Ninety-four out of 410 COVID-19 inpatients were included in the final analysis, of whom 19 (20.2%) received early treatment with sotrovimab. The median age was 73 years (IQR 61–83), and 35 (37.2%) were female. Although the treatment group was significantly older and had more comorbidities, there was a lower proportion of progression to oxygen requirement (31.6% vs. 54.7%), ICU admission (10.5% vs. 24.0%), or mortality (5.3% vs. 13.3%). Kaplan–Meier curves showed a significant difference in time to in-hospital deterioration (log-rank test, p = 0.043). Cox proportional hazards model for in-hospital deterioration showed that sotrovimab treatment was protective (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.17–0.99; p = 0.047) after adjustment for baseline ISARIC deterioration score. Our findings support the use of sotrovimab for early treatment in hospitalized patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 at a high risk of disease progression. and Mehran Monchi Received: 11 February 2022 Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; sotrovimab; treatment; monoclonal antibody Accepted: 3 March 2022 Published: 5 March 2022 Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Copyright: © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/
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