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0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Mortality 2% Improvement Relative Risk c19early.org/f Rauchman et al. Fluvoxamine for COVID-19 Prophylaxis Is prophylaxis with fluvoxamine beneficial for COVID-19? Retrospective study in the USA No significant difference in mortality Rauchman et al., medRxiv, doi:10.1101/2021.10.25.21265218 Favors fluvoxamine Favors control
Ongoing use of SSRIs and the hospital course of COVID-19 patients: a retrospective outcome analysis
Rauchman et al., medRxiv, doi:10.1101/2021.10.25.21265218 (Preprint)
Rauchman et al., Ongoing use of SSRIs and the hospital course of COVID-19 patients: a retrospective outcome analysis, medRxiv, doi:10.1101/2021.10.25.21265218 (Preprint)
Oct 2021   Source   PDF  
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Retrospective 9,043 COVID-19+ patients in the USA, 832 with existing SSRI use, showing no significant difference in mortality. None of the patients were on fluvoxamine. Authors note that specific SSRIs such as fluvoxamine may be effective, and that fluvoxamine is a sigma-1 receptor (S1R) agonist and has the strongest binding affinity to S1R of all SSRIs.
risk of death, 2.0% lower, OR 0.98, p = 0.83, RR approximated with OR.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Rauchman et al., 26 Oct 2021, retrospective, USA, preprint, 6 authors.
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Abstract: medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.10.25.21265218; this version posted October 26, 2021. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license . Ongoing use of SSRIs and the hospital course of COVID-19 patients: a retrospective outcome analysis Steven H. Rauchman1, Sherri G. Mendelson2, Courtney Rauchman1, Lora J. Kasselman3, Aaron Pinkhasov3, Allison B. Reiss3 1 The Fresno Institute of Neuroscience, Fresno, CA, 93730 2 Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, CA, 91345 3 NYU Long Island School of Medicine, Mineola, NY, 11501 Address for correspondence and reprints: Steven H. Rauchman 11550 Indian Hills Road - Suite 341 Mission Hills, CA 91345 Phone: (818) 365-0606 E-mail: dr.rauchman@yahoo.com NOTE: This preprint reports new research that has not been certified by peer review and should not be used to guide clinical practice. medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.10.25.21265218; this version posted October 26, 2021. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license . Abstract Background: The SARS-CoV2 virus continues to have devastating consequences worldwide. Though vaccinations have helped to reduce the impact of the virus, new strains still pose a threat to unvaccinated, and to a lesser extent vaccinated, individuals. Therefore, it is imperative to identify treatments that can prevent the development of severe COVID-19. Recently, acute use of SSRI antidepressants in COVID+ patients has been shown to reduce the severity of symptoms compared to placebo. Since SSRIs are a widely used anti-depressant, the aim of this study was to determine if COVID+ patients already on SSRI treatment upon admission to the hospital had reduced mortality compared to COVID+ patients not on chronic SSRI treatment. Methods: A retrospective observational study design was used. Electronic medical records of 9,043 patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of Covid-19 from 03/2020 to 03/2021from six hospitals were queried for demographic and clinical information. Using R, a logistic regression model was run with mortality as the outcome and SSRI status as the exposure. An adjusted logistic regression model was run to account for age category, gender, and race. All tests were considered significant at p of 0.05 or less. Results: In this sample, no patients admitted on SSRIs had them discontinued. This is consistent with current recommendations. There was no significant difference in the odds of dying between COVID+ patients on chronic SSRIs vs COVID+ patients not taking SSRIs, after controlling for age category, gender, and race. The odds of COVID+ patients on SSRIs dying was 0.98 (95%CI: 0.81, 1.18) compared to COVID+ patients not on SSRIs (p=0.83). Conclusion: In times of pandemics due to novel infectious agents it is difficult, but critical to evaluate safety and efficacy of drugs that might be repurposed for treatment. This large sample size of 9,043 patients suggests that there will be no significant benefit to use of SSRIs to medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.10.25.21265218; this version posted October 26, 2021...
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