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0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Mortality 67% Improvement Relative Risk ICU admission 67% Hospitalization 67% Recovery 37% Viral clearance, day 7 58% Viral clearance, day 14 -50% Viral clearance, day 21 67% c19early.org/q Di Pierro et al. NCT04861298 Quercetin RCT EARLY TREATMENT Favors quercetin Favors control
Quercetin as a possible complementary agent for early-stage COVID-19: Concluding results of a randomized clinical trial
Di Pierro et al., Frontiers in Pharmacology, doi:10.3389/fphar.2022.1096853, NCT04861298 (history)
Di Pierro et al., Quercetin as a possible complementary agent for early-stage COVID-19: Concluding results of a randomized.., Frontiers in Pharmacology, doi:10.3389/fphar.2022.1096853, NCT04861298
Jan 2023   Source   PDF  
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RCT 100 outpatients in Pakistan, 50 treated with quercetin phytosome, showing faster viral clearance and improved recovery with treatment. Patients in the treatment group were significantly younger (41 vs. 54). This study is excluded in the after exclusion results of meta analysis: randomization resulted in significant baseline differences that were not adjusted for.
risk of death, 66.7% lower, RR 0.33, p = 1.00, treatment 0 of 50 (0.0%), control 1 of 50 (2.0%), NNT 50, relative risk is not 0 because of continuity correction due to zero events (with reciprocal of the contrasting arm).
risk of ICU admission, 66.7% lower, RR 0.33, p = 1.00, treatment 0 of 50 (0.0%), control 1 of 50 (2.0%), NNT 50, relative risk is not 0 because of continuity correction due to zero events (with reciprocal of the contrasting arm).
risk of hospitalization, 66.7% lower, RR 0.33, p = 1.00, treatment 0 of 50 (0.0%), control 1 of 50 (2.0%), NNT 50, relative risk is not 0 because of continuity correction due to zero events (with reciprocal of the contrasting arm).
risk of no recovery, 36.8% lower, RR 0.63, p = 0.007, treatment 24 of 50 (48.0%), control 38 of 50 (76.0%), NNT 3.6, day 7.
risk of no viral clearance, 57.9% lower, RR 0.42, p < 0.001, treatment 16 of 50 (32.0%), control 38 of 50 (76.0%), NNT 2.3, mid-recovery, day 7.
risk of no viral clearance, 50.0% higher, RR 1.50, p = 1.00, treatment 3 of 50 (6.0%), control 2 of 50 (4.0%), day 14.
risk of no viral clearance, 66.7% lower, RR 0.33, p = 1.00, treatment 0 of 50 (0.0%), control 1 of 50 (2.0%), NNT 50, relative risk is not 0 because of continuity correction due to zero events (with reciprocal of the contrasting arm), day 21.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Di Pierro et al., 13 Jan 2023, Randomized Controlled Trial, Pakistan, peer-reviewed, mean age 47.6, 13 authors, study period December 2020 - September 2021, trial NCT04861298 (history).
Contact: f.dipierro@vellejaresearch.com, amjadkhan@lumhs.edu.pk.
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Abstract: TYPE Original Research PUBLISHED 13 January 2023 DOI 10.3389/fphar.2022.1096853 OPEN ACCESS EDITED BY Michał Tomczyk, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland REVIEWED BY Mithun Rudrapal, Rasiklal M. Dhariwal Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, India Maria Russo, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council (CNR), Italy Syed Mohammed Basheeruddin Asdaq, University of Almaarefa, Saudi Arabia *CORRESPONDENCE Francesco Di Pierro, f.dipierro@vellejaresearch.com Amjad Khan, amjadkhan@lumhs.edu.pk SPECIALTY SECTION This article was submitted to Ethnopharmacology, a section of the journal Frontiers in Pharmacology RECEIVED 12 November 2022 Quercetin as a possible complementary agent for early-stage COVID-19: Concluding results of a randomized clinical trial Francesco Di Pierro 1,2*, Amjad Khan 3*, Somia Iqtadar 4, Sami Ullah Mumtaz 4, Muhammad Nabeel Akbar Chaudhry 5, Alexander Bertuccioli 6, Giuseppe Derosa 7,8, Pamela Maffioli 8, Stefano Togni 9, Antonella Riva 9, Pietro Allegrini 9, Martino Recchia 10 and Nicola Zerbinati 11 1 Scientific and Research Department, Velleja Research, Milan, Italy, 2Digestive Endoscopy, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy, 3INEOS Oxford Institute for Antimicrobial Research, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, 4Department of Medicine, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Pakistan, 5 Punjab Institute of Cardiology, Lahore, Pakistan, 6Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino, Urbino, Italy, 7Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, 8Centre of Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, 9R&D Department, Indena S.p.A, Milan, Italy, 10Medistat, Milan, Italy, 11 Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy ACCEPTED 15 December 2022 PUBLISHED 13 January 2023 CITATION Di Pierro F, Khan A, Iqtadar S, Mumtaz SU, Chaudhry MNA, Bertuccioli A, Derosa G, Maffioli P, Togni S, Riva A, Allegrini P, Recchia M and Zerbinati N (2023), Quercetin as a possible complementary agent for early-stage COVID-19: Concluding results of a randomized clinical trial. Front. Pharmacol. 13:1096853. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2022.1096853 COPYRIGHT © 2023 Di Pierro, Khan, Iqtadar, Mumtaz, Chaudhry, Bertuccioli, Derosa, Maffioli, Togni, Riva, Allegrini, Recchia and Zerbinati. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Frontiers in Pharmacology Background: Quercetin, a natural polyphenol with demonstrated broadspectrum antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties, has been proposed as an adjuvant for early-stage coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID19) infection. Objective: To explore the possible therapeutic effect of quercetin in outpatients with early-stage mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19. Methods: This was an open-label randomized controlled clinical trial conducted at the department of medicine, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, PK. Patients were randomized to receive either standard of care (SC) plus an oral quercetin supplement..
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