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All Studies   Meta Analysis    Recent:   

Vitamin D deficiency and SARS-CoV-2 infection: Big-data analysis from March 2020 to March 2021. D-COVID study

Álvarez et al., bioRxiv, doi:10.1101/2022.10.27.514012
Oct 2022  
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Mortality 39% Improvement Relative Risk ICU admission 55% Hospitalization 43% Vitamin D for COVID-19  Álvarez et al.  Sufficiency Are vitamin D levels associated with COVID-19 outcomes? Retrospective 36,261 patients in Spain (March 2020 - March 2021) Lower mortality (p<0.0001) and ICU admission (p<0.0001) c19early.org Álvarez et al., bioRxiv, October 2022 Favorsvitamin D Favorscontrol 0 0.5 1 1.5 2+
Vitamin D for COVID-19
8th treatment shown to reduce risk in October 2020
 
*, now with p < 0.00000000001 from 121 studies, recognized in 9 countries.
No treatment is 100% effective. Protocols combine treatments. * >10% efficacy, ≥3 studies.
4,300+ studies for 75 treatments. c19early.org
Retrospective free-text analysis of 143,157 COVID-19 patients, showing vitamin D deficiency associated with mortality, ICU admission, and hospitalization in unadjusted results.
This is the 146th of 198 COVID-19 sufficiency studies for vitamin D, which collectively show higher levels reduce risk with p<0.0000000001 (1 in 361,397 vigintillion).
This study is excluded in the after exclusion results of meta analysis: unadjusted results with no group details.
risk of death, 38.8% lower, RR 0.61, p < 0.001, high D levels 4,871 of 33,673 (14.5%), low D levels 611 of 2,588 (23.6%), NNT 11, inverted to make RR<1 favor high D levels, odds ratio converted to relative risk.
risk of ICU admission, 54.7% lower, RR 0.45, p < 0.001, high D levels 289 of 33,673 (0.9%), low D levels 49 of 2,588 (1.9%), NNT 97, inverted to make RR<1 favor high D levels, odds ratio converted to relative risk.
risk of hospitalization, 43.0% lower, RR 0.57, p < 0.001, high D levels 8,905 of 33,673 (26.4%), low D levels 1,202 of 2,588 (46.4%), NNT 5.0, inverted to make RR<1 favor high D levels, odds ratio converted to relative risk.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Álvarez et al., 28 Oct 2022, retrospective, Spain, preprint, 1 author, study period March 2020 - March 2021. Contact: noemi.anguita@salud.madrid.org.
This PaperVitamin DAll
Vitamin D deficiency and SARS‑CoV‑2 infection: Big-data analysis from March 2020 to March 2021. D-COVID study
Álvarez M Neira, Jiménez G Navarro, Sánchez N Anguita, Olano M M Bermejo, R Queipó, Nuñez M Benavent, Jimenez A Parralejo, Yepes G López, Nieto C Sáez
doi:10.1101/2022.10.27.514012
Background: Vitamin D has been proposed to have immunomodulatory functions and therefore play a role in coronavirus infection . However, there is no conclusive evidence on its impact on COVID-19 infection and evolution. Objective: To study the association between COVID-19 infection and vitamin D deficiency in patients of a terciary university hospital. To investigate the clinical evolution and prognosis of patients with COVID-19 and vitamin D deficiency. Methods: Using big-data analytics and artificial intelligence through the SAVANA Manager clinical platform, we analysed clinical data from patients with COVID-19 atended in a terciary university hospital from March 2020 to March 2021. Results: Of the 143.157 analysed patients, 36.261 subjects had COVID-19 infection (25.33%); during this period; of these 2588 had vitamin D deficiency (7.14%). Among subjects with COVID-19 and vitamin D deficiency, there was a higher proportion of women OR 1.45 [95% CI 1.33-1.57], adults older than 80 years OR 2.63 [95%CI 2.38-2.91], people living in nursing homes OR 2.88 [95%CI 2.95-3.45] and walking dependence OR 3.45 [95%CI 2.85-4.26]. Regarding clinical course, a higher number of subjects with COVID-19 and vitamin D deficiency required hospitalitation OR 2.41 [95%CI 2.22-2-61], intensive unit care (ICU) OR 2.22 [95% CI 1.64-3.02], had a longer mean hospital stay 3.94 (2.29) p=0.02 and higher mortality OR 1.82 [95%CI 1.66-2.01].) Conclusion: Low serum 25 (OH) Vitamin-D level was significantly associated with a worse clinical evolution and prognosis of COVID-19 infection. We found a higher proportion of institutionalised and dependent people over 80 years of age among patients with COVID-19 and vitamin D deficiency.
DECLARATIONS Competing interests: Benavent Nuñez M, Parralejo Jimenez A, López Yepes G report that the y are employees at Medsavana. There are no other financial competing interests regarding this paper. Funding: There are no non-financial competing interests.
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