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Myricitrin for COVID-19

Myricitrin has been reported as potentially beneficial for treatment of COVID-19. We have not reviewed these studies. See all other treatments.
Ali et al., Exploring the Therapeutic Potential of Petiveria alliacea L. Phytochemicals: A Computational Study on Inhibiting SARS-CoV-2’s Main Protease (Mpro), Molecules, doi:10.3390/molecules29112524
The outbreak of SARS-CoV-2, also known as the COVID-19 pandemic, is still a critical risk factor for both human life and the global economy. Although, several promising therapies have been introduced in the literature to inhibit SARS-CoV-2, most of them are synthetic drugs that may have some adverse effects on the human body. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to carry out an in-silico investigation into the medicinal properties of Petiveria alliacea L. (P. alliacea L.)-mediated phytocompounds for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infections since phytochemicals have fewer adverse effects compared to synthetic drugs. To explore potential phytocompounds from P. alliacea L. as candidate drug molecules, we selected the infection-causing main protease (Mpro) of SARS-CoV-2 as the receptor protein. The molecular docking analysis of these receptor proteins with the different phytocompounds of P. alliacea L. was performed using AutoDock Vina. Then, we selected the three top-ranked phytocompounds (myricitrin, engeletin, and astilbin) as the candidate drug molecules based on their highest binding affinity scores of −8.9, −8.7 and −8.3 (Kcal/mol), respectively. Then, a 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study was performed for their complexes with Mpro using YASARA software, computed RMSD, RMSF, PCA, DCCM, MM/PBSA, and free energy landscape (FEL), and found their almost stable binding performance. In addition, biological activity, ADME/T, DFT, and drug-likeness analyses exhibited the suitable pharmacokinetics properties of the selected phytocompounds. Therefore, the results of this study might be a useful resource for formulating a safe treatment plan for SARS-CoV-2 infections after experimental validation in wet-lab and clinical trials.
Masoudi-Sobhanzadeh et al., Structure-based drug repurposing against COVID-19 and emerging infectious diseases: methods, resources and discoveries, Briefings in Bioinformatics, doi:10.1093/bib/bbab113
AbstractTo attain promising pharmacotherapies, researchers have applied drug repurposing (DR) techniques to discover the candidate medicines to combat the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Although many DR approaches have been introduced for treating different diseases, only structure-based DR (SBDR) methods can be employed as the first therapeutic option against the COVID-19 pandemic because they rely on the rudimentary information about the diseases such as the sequence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 genome. Hence, to try out new treatments for the disease, the first attempts have been made based on the SBDR methods which seem to be among the proper choices for discovering the potential medications against the emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Given the importance of SBDR approaches, in the present review, well-known SBDR methods are summarized, and their merits are investigated. Then, the databases and software applications, utilized for repurposing the drugs against COVID-19, are introduced. Besides, the identified drugs are categorized based on their targets. Finally, a comparison is made between the SBDR approaches and other DR methods, and some possible future directions are proposed.
Dofuor et al., The Global Impact of COVID-19: Historical Development, Molecular Characterization, Drug Discovery and Future Directions, Clinical Pathology, doi:10.1177/2632010x231218075
In December 2019, an outbreak of a respiratory disease called the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by a new coronavirus known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) began in Wuhan, China. The SARS-CoV-2, an encapsulated positive-stranded RNA virus, spread worldwide with disastrous consequences for people’s health, economies, and quality of life. The disease has had far-reaching impacts on society, including economic disruption, school closures, and increased stress and anxiety. It has also highlighted disparities in healthcare access and outcomes, with marginalized communities disproportionately affected by the SARS-CoV-2. The symptoms of COVID-19 range from mild to severe. There is presently no effective cure. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made in developing COVID-19 vaccine for different therapeutic targets. For instance, scientists developed multifold vaccine candidates shortly after the COVID-19 outbreak after Pfizer and AstraZeneca discovered the initial COVID-19 vaccines. These vaccines reduce disease spread, severity, and mortality. The addition of rapid diagnostics to microscopy for COVID-19 diagnosis has proven crucial. Our review provides a thorough overview of the historical development of COVID-19 and molecular and biochemical characterization of the SARS-CoV-2. We highlight the potential contributions from insect and plant sources as anti-SARS-CoV-2 and present directions for future research.
Srivastava et al., A Brief Review on Medicinal Plants-At-Arms against COVID-19, Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases, doi:10.1155/2023/7598307
COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 has impacted human livelihood globally. Strenuous efforts have been employed for its control and prevention; however, with recent reports on mutated strains with much higher infectivity, transmissibility, and ability to evade immunity developed from previous SARS-CoV-2 infections, prevention alternatives must be prepared beforehand in case. We have perused over 128 recent works (found on Google Scholar, PubMed, and ScienceDirect as of February 2023) on medicinal plants and their compounds for anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity and eventually reviewed 102 of them. The clinical application and the curative effect were reported high in China and in India. Accordingly, this review highlights the unprecedented opportunities offered by medicinal plants and their compounds, candidates as the therapeutic agent, against COVID-19 by acting as viral protein inhibitors and immunomodulator in (32 clinical trials and hundreds of in silico experiments) conjecture with modern science. Moreover, the associated foreseeable challenges for their viral outbreak management were discussed in comparison to synthetic drugs.
Giordano et al., Food Plant Secondary Metabolites Antiviral Activity and Their Possible Roles in SARS-CoV-2 Treatment: An Overview, Molecules, doi:10.3390/molecules28062470
Natural products and plant extracts exhibit many biological activities, including that related to the defense mechanisms against parasites. Many studies have investigated the biological functions of secondary metabolites and reported evidence of antiviral activities. The pandemic emergencies have further increased the interest in finding antiviral agents, and efforts are oriented to investigate possible activities of secondary plant metabolites against human viruses and their potential application in treating or preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this review, we performed a comprehensive analysis of studies through in silico and in vitro investigations, also including in vivo applications and clinical trials, to evaluate the state of knowledge on the antiviral activities of secondary metabolites against human viruses and their potential application in treating or preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection, with a particular focus on natural compounds present in food plants. Although some of the food plant secondary metabolites seem to be useful in the prevention and as a possible therapeutic management against SARS-CoV-2, up to now, no molecules can be used as a potential treatment for COVID-19; however, more research is needed.
Jamshidnia et al., An Update on Promising Agents against COVID-19: Secondary Metabolites and Mechanistic Aspects, Current Pharmaceutical Design, doi:10.2174/1381612828666220722124826
Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‑19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and is associated with a high level of mortality. Objective: This updated review aims to present the most important traditional medicinal plants and some of their secondary metabolites that have previously and more recently been shown to affect viruses and may represent a beneficial contributory step against SARS-CoV-2 as the cause of COVID-19. Moreover, the mechanism aspects of these secondary metabolites were discussed, which may help find more reliable drugs against SARS-CoV-2. Methods: Articles were searched in scientific websites including Google Scholar, Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, and IranMedex using the search terms herbal medicine and traditional medicine with coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, or COVID-19. Human, animal, and in vitro studies were identified in the search. Results: Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites may possess a potential role in combating this disease, and researchers suggest that some of these plants and their constituent compounds have inhibitory activity on coronaviruses. Numerous medicinal plants, their extracts, and secondary metabolites have been investigated over a period of time for antiviral activity. Among them, kaempferol, silybin, myricitrin, licoleafol, and curcumin are promising agents with potential activity against SARS-CoV-2. Natural compounds can form strong bonds with the active sites of SARS-CoV-2 protease. Structural and non-structural SARS-CoV-2 proteins such as Spike protein, PLpro, and 3CLpro are inhibited by these phytochemicals. Conclusion: Prospective treatments targeted at the life cycle stages of the virus may eventuate from research endeavors, and it must not be discounted that therapy originally derived from plant secondary metabolite sources may potentially have a part to play.
Flores-Félix et al., Consumption of Phenolic-Rich Food and Dietary Supplements as a Key Tool in SARS-CoV-19 Infection, Foods, doi:10.3390/foods10092084
The first cases of COVID-19, which is caused by the SARS-CoV-2, were reported in December 2019. The vertiginous worldwide expansion of SARS-CoV-2 caused the collapse of health systems in several countries due to the high severity of the COVID-19. In addition to the vaccines, the search for active compounds capable of preventing and/or fighting the infection has been the main direction of research. Since the beginning of this pandemic, some evidence has highlighted the importance of a phenolic-rich diet as a strategy to reduce the progression of this disease, including the severity of the symptoms. Some of these compounds (e.g., curcumin, gallic acid or quercetin) already showed capacity to limit the infection of viruses by inhibiting entry into the cell through its binding to protein Spike, regulating the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, disrupting the replication in cells by inhibition of viral proteases, and/or suppressing and modulating the host’s immune response. Therefore, this review intends to discuss the most recent findings on the potential of phenolics to prevent SARS-CoV-2.
Please send us corrections, updates, or comments. c19early involves the extraction of 100,000+ datapoints from thousands of papers. Community updates help ensure high accuracy. Treatments and other interventions are complementary. All practical, effective, and safe means should be used based on risk/benefit analysis. No treatment or intervention is 100% available and effective for all current and future variants. We do not provide medical advice. Before taking any medication, consult a qualified physician who can provide personalized advice and details of risks and benefits based on your medical history and situation. FLCCC and WCH provide treatment protocols.
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