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0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Mortality, E-DII 24% Improvement Relative Risk Mortality, DII 30% Severe case, E-DII 28% Severe case, DII 29% Case, E-DII 15% Case, DII 9% c19early.org/dt Zhao et al. Diet for COVID-19 Prophylaxis Favors healthy diet Favors control
Associations between the Dietary Inflammatory Index and COVID-19 Outcomes in the UK Biobank Cohort
Zhao et al., SSRN Electronic Journal, doi:10.2139/ssrn.4300209
Zhao et al., Associations between the Dietary Inflammatory Index and COVID-19 Outcomes in the UK Biobank Cohort, SSRN Electronic Journal, doi:10.2139/ssrn.4300209
Dec 2022   Source   PDF  
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UK Biobank retrospective 196,154 participants with 11,288 COVID-19 cases, showing lower COVID-19 mortality, severity, and incidence for lower dietary inflammatory scores.
risk of death, 24.2% lower, RR 0.76, p = 0.13, higher quality diet 39,230, lower quality diet 39,231, adjusted per study, inverted to make RR<1 favor higher quality diet, E-DII, quintile 1 vs. quintile 5, multivariable, model 4.
risk of death, 30.1% lower, RR 0.70, p = 0.04, higher quality diet 39,230, lower quality diet 39,231, adjusted per study, inverted to make RR<1 favor higher quality diet, DII, quintile 1 vs. quintile 5, multivariable, model 4.
risk of severe case, 28.1% lower, RR 0.72, p < 0.001, higher quality diet 39,230, lower quality diet 39,231, adjusted per study, inverted to make RR<1 favor higher quality diet, E-DII, quintile 1 vs. quintile 5, multivariable, model 4.
risk of severe case, 28.6% lower, RR 0.71, p < 0.001, higher quality diet 39,230, lower quality diet 39,231, adjusted per study, inverted to make RR<1 favor higher quality diet, DII, quintile 1 vs. quintile 5, multivariable, model 4.
risk of case, 14.5% lower, RR 0.85, p < 0.001, higher quality diet 39,230, lower quality diet 39,231, adjusted per study, inverted to make RR<1 favor higher quality diet, E-DII, quintile 1 vs. quintile 5, multivariable, model 4.
risk of case, 9.1% lower, RR 0.91, p = 0.002, higher quality diet 39,230, lower quality diet 39,231, adjusted per study, inverted to make RR<1 favor higher quality diet, DII, quintile 1 vs. quintile 5, multivariable, model 4.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Zhao et al., 14 Dec 2022, retrospective, United Kingdom, peer-reviewed, survey, 9 authors, study period January 2020 - March 2021.
Contact: jhebert@mailbox.sc.edu.
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Abstract: UK Biobank Cohort we d Associations between the Dietary Inflammatory Index and COVID-19 outcomes in the Author: Longgang Zhao, MSc1,2 Michael D. Wirth, PhD1,2,3,4 Fanny Petermann-Rocha, PhD 5,6 Solange Parra-Soto, PhD 5,7 John C. Mathers, PhD 8 Jill P. Pell, PhD 9 Frederick K. Ho, Authors’ Affiliations ev ie PhD 9 Carlos A. Celis-Morales, PhD5,10 James R. Hébert, ScD1,2,4 1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA. 2. Cancer Prevention and Control Program and Department of Epidemiology and ee rr Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA. 3. College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA. 4. Department of Nutrition, Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, SC, 29201, USA. ot p 5. School of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8TA, UK. 6. Centro de Investigación Biomédica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago, 8370068, Chile. Chile. tn 7. Department of Nutrition and Public Health, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chillan, 3780000, rin 8. Human Nutrition & Exercise Research Centre, Centre for Healthier Lives, Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. 9. School of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8RZ, UK. ep 10. Human Performance Lab, Education, Physical Activity and Health Research Unit, Pr University Católica del Maule, Talca, 3466706, Chile. Correspondence: James R. Hébert 1/24 This preprint research paper has not been peer reviewed. Electronic copy available at: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4300209 we d Cancer Prevention and Control Program and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. E-mail: JHEBERT@mailbox.sc.edu. ev ie Title page Running title: DII and COVID-19 Total page length: 25 pages Word count: ee rr Text (Excluding Abstract, References, Tables, and Figures) = 2982 words; Abstract = 292 words; References = 54 Tables and Figures: Tables: 3; Figures: 0 Supplemental tables: 1 Supplemental figures: 4 ot p Additional Files: Abbreviations used in this paper: tn DII, dietary inflammatory index E-DII, energy-adjusted DII rin NHS, National Health Service ep Licence Statement I, the Submitting Author has the right to grant and does grant on behalf of all authors of the Work (as defined in the author licence), an exclusive licence and/or a non-exclusive licence Pr for contributions from authors who are: i) UK Crown employees; ii) where BMJ has agreed a CC-BY licence shall apply, and/or iii) in accordance with the terms applicable for US Federal 2/24 This preprint research paper has not been peer reviewed. Electronic copy available at: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4300209 we d Government officers or employees acting as part of their official duties; on a worldwide, perpetual, irrevocable, royalty-free basis to BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (“BMJ”) its licensees. Research in context ev ie Evidence before this study We conducted a systematic search of the National Library of Medicine for articles on associations between diet and COVID-19 risk. We found that a limited number of studies have evaluated the role of specific food groups in the onset and progression of SARS-CoV-2 ee rr infection and COVID-19 symptoms. However, evidence on associations..
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