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Rivaroxaban for COVID-19

Rivaroxaban has been reported as potentially beneficial for treatment of COVID-19. We have not reviewed these studies. See all other treatments.
Lei et al., Small molecules in the treatment of COVID-19, Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy, doi:10.1038/s41392-022-01249-8
AbstractThe outbreak of COVID-19 has become a global crisis, and brought severe disruptions to societies and economies. Until now, effective therapeutics against COVID-19 are in high demand. Along with our improved understanding of the structure, function, and pathogenic process of SARS-CoV-2, many small molecules with potential anti-COVID-19 effects have been developed. So far, several antiviral strategies were explored. Besides directly inhibition of viral proteins such as RdRp and Mpro, interference of host enzymes including ACE2 and proteases, and blocking relevant immunoregulatory pathways represented by JAK/STAT, BTK, NF-κB, and NLRP3 pathways, are regarded feasible in drug development. The development of small molecules to treat COVID-19 has been achieved by several strategies, including computer-aided lead compound design and screening, natural product discovery, drug repurposing, and combination therapy. Several small molecules representative by remdesivir and paxlovid have been proved or authorized emergency use in many countries. And many candidates have entered clinical-trial stage. Nevertheless, due to the epidemiological features and variability issues of SARS-CoV-2, it is necessary to continue exploring novel strategies against COVID-19. This review discusses the current findings in the development of small molecules for COVID-19 treatment. Moreover, their detailed mechanism of action, chemical structures, and preclinical and clinical efficacies are discussed.
Zengin et al., Benchmarking ANI potentials as a rescoring function and screening FDA drugs for SARS-CoV-2 Mpro, Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design, doi:10.1007/s10822-024-00554-4
AbstractHere, we introduce the use of ANI-ML potentials as a rescoring function in the host–guest interaction in molecular docking. Our results show that the “docking power” of ANI potentials can compete with the current scoring functions at the same level of computational cost. Benchmarking studies on CASF-2016 dataset showed that ANI is ranked in the top 5 scoring functions among the other 34 tested. In particular, the ANI predicted interaction energies when used in conjunction with GOLD-PLP scoring function can boost the top ranked solution to be the closest to the x-ray structure. Rapid and accurate calculation of interaction energies between ligand and protein also enables screening of millions of drug candidates/docking poses. Using a unique protocol in which docking by GOLD-PLP, rescoring by ANI-ML potentials and extensive MD simulations along with end state free energy methods are combined, we have screened FDA approved drugs against the SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro). The top six drug molecules suggested by the consensus of these free energy methods have already been in clinical trials or proposed as potential drug molecules in previous theoretical and experimental studies, approving the validity and the power of accuracy in our screening method.
Rensi et al., Homology Modeling of TMPRSS2 Yields Candidate Drugs That May Inhibit Entry of SARS-CoV-2 into Human Cells, American Chemical Society (ACS), doi:10.26434/chemrxiv.12009582.v1
The most rapid path to discovering treatment options for the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is to find existing medications that are active against the virus. We have focused on identifying repurposing candidates for the transmembrane serine protease family member II (TMPRSS2), which is critical for entry of coronaviruses into cells. Using known 3D structures of close homologs, we created seven homology models. We also identified a set of serine protease inhibitor drugs, generated several conformations of each, and docked them into our models. We used three known chemical (non-drug) inhibitors and one validated inhibitor of TMPRSS2 in MERS as benchmark compounds and found six compounds with predicted high binding affinity in the range of the known inhibitors. We also showed that a previously published weak inhibitor, Camostat, had a significantly lower binding score than our six compounds. All six compounds are anticoagulants with significant and potentially dangerous clinical effects and side effects. Nonetheless, if these compounds significantly inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection, they could represent a potentially useful clinical tool.
Oliver et al., Different drug approaches to COVID-19 treatment worldwide: an update of new drugs and drugs repositioning to fight against the novel coronavirus, Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines and Immunotherapy, doi:10.1177/25151355221144845
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in the second half of 2022, there are about 606 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and almost 6,500,000 deaths around the world. A pandemic was declared by the WHO in March 2020 when the new coronavirus spread around the world. The short time between the first cases in Wuhan and the declaration of a pandemic initiated the search for ways to stop the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or to attempt to cure the disease COVID-19. More than ever, research groups are developing vaccines, drugs, and immunobiological compounds, and they are even trying to repurpose drugs in an increasing number of clinical trials. There are great expectations regarding the vaccine’s effectiveness for the prevention of COVID-19. However, producing sufficient doses of vaccines for the entire population and SARS-CoV-2 variants are challenges for pharmaceutical industries. On the contrary, efforts have been made to create different vaccines with different approaches so that they can be used by the entire population. Here, we summarize about 8162 clinical trials, showing a greater number of drug clinical trials in Europe and the United States and less clinical trials in low-income countries. Promising results about the use of new drugs and drug repositioning, monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma, and mesenchymal stem cells to control viral infection/replication or the hyper-inflammatory response to the new coronavirus bring hope to treat the disease.
MacFadden et al., Screening Large Population Health Databases for Potential COVID-19 Therapeutics: A Pharmacopeia-Wide Association Study (PWAS) of Commonly Prescribed Medications, Open Forum Infectious Diseases, doi:10.1093/ofid/ofac156
Abstract Background For both the current and future pandemics, there is a need for high-throughput drug screening methods to identify existing drugs with potential preventative and/or therapeutic activity. Epidemiologic studies could complement lab-focused efforts to identify possible therapeutic agents. Methods We performed a pharmacopeia-wide association study (PWAS) to identify commonly prescribed medications and medication classes that are associated with the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in older individuals (>65 years) in long-term care homes (LTCH) and the community, between January 15 th, 2020 and December 31 st, 2020, across the province of Ontario, Canada. Results 26,121 cases and 2,369,020 controls from LTCH and the community were included in this analysis. Many of the drugs and drug classes evaluated did not yield significant associations with SARS-CoV-2 detection. However, some drugs and drug classes appeared significantly associated with reduced SARS-CoV-2 detection, including cardioprotective drug classes such as statins (weighted OR 0.91, standard p-value <0.01, adjusted p-value <0.01) and beta-blockers (weighted OR 0.87, standard p-value <0.01, adjusted p-value 0.01), along with individual agents ranging from levetiracetam (weighted OR 0.70, standard p-value <0.01, adjusted p-value <0.01) to fluoxetine (weighted OR 0.86, standard p-value 0.013, adjusted p-value 0.198) to digoxin (weighted OR 0.89, standard p-value <0.01, adjusted p-value 0.02). Conclusions Using this epidemiologic approach which can be applied to current and future pandemics we have identified a variety of target drugs and drug classes that could offer therapeutic benefit in COVID-19 and may warrant further validation. Some of these agents (e.g. fluoxetine) have already been identified for their therapeutic potential.
Please send us corrections, updates, or comments. c19early involves the extraction of 100,000+ datapoints from thousands of papers. Community updates help ensure high accuracy. Treatments and other interventions are complementary. All practical, effective, and safe means should be used based on risk/benefit analysis. No treatment or intervention is 100% available and effective for all current and future variants. We do not provide medical advice. Before taking any medication, consult a qualified physician who can provide personalized advice and details of risks and benefits based on your medical history and situation. FLCCC and WCH provide treatment protocols.
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