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All Studies   All Outcomes    Recent:   
0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Improvement in SpO2 <5 53% Improvement Relative Risk Improvement in SpO2 93% Improvement in SpO2 <2 93% Improvement in SpO2 <3 96% Improvement in SpO2 <4 82% Improvement in SpO2 <5 (b) 53% Improvement in SpO2 <6 35% Improvement in SpO2 <7 35% Improvement in SpO2 <8 18% Improvement in SpO2 <9 18% Improvement in SpO2 <10 12% Improvement in SpO2 <11 6% Thermotherapy  Dominguez-Nicolas et al.  LATE TREATMENT Is late treatment with thermotherapy beneficial for COVID-19? Prospective study of 22 patients in Mexico Greater improvement with thermotherapy (not stat. sig., p=0.054) c19early.org Dominguez-Nicolas et al., Medicine, May 2021 Favors thermotherapy Favors control

Low-field thoracic magnetic stimulation increases peripheral oxygen saturation levels in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients

Dominguez-Nicolas et al., Medicine, doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000027444 (date from preprint), NCT04895267
May 2021  
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42nd treatment shown to reduce risk in December 2023
 
*, now known with p = 0.026 from 4 studies.
Lower risk for recovery.
No treatment is 100% effective. Protocols combine complementary and synergistic treatments. * >10% efficacy in meta analysis with ≥3 clinical studies.
3,800+ studies for 60+ treatments. c19early.org
Single-blind, sham-controlled, crossover study of 17 COVID-19 outpatients showing significantly increased peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels correlated with hyperthermia (up to 44°C) produced by 30 minutes of low-field thoracic magnetic stimulation (LF-ThMS) applied to the dorsal thorax. The safety and lack of adverse events supports future research into mechanisms and potential therapeutic use of localized heat therapy for improving respiratory function in COVID-19 patients.
This study is excluded in the after exclusion results of meta analysis: the study design does not provide a clear relative risk.
The weight of this study is limited in meta analysis: the study provides significant evidence of benefit, but the study design does not provide a clear relative risk.
improvement in SpO2 <5, 52.9% lower, RR 0.47, p = 0.05, treatment 8 of 17 (47.1%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 1.9.
no improvement in SpO2, 93.0% lower, RR 0.07, p = 0.006, treatment 0 of 17 (0.0%), control 3 of 5 (60.0%), NNT 1.7, relative risk is not 0 because of continuity correction due to zero events (with reciprocal of the contrasting arm).
improvement in SpO2 <2, 93.0% lower, RR 0.07, p = 0.006, treatment 0 of 17 (0.0%), control 3 of 5 (60.0%), NNT 1.7, relative risk is not 0 because of continuity correction due to zero events (with reciprocal of the contrasting arm).
improvement in SpO2 <3, 95.7% lower, RR 0.04, p < 0.001, treatment 0 of 17 (0.0%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 1.0, relative risk is not 0 because of continuity correction due to zero events (with reciprocal of the contrasting arm).
improvement in SpO2 <4, 82.4% lower, RR 0.18, p = 0.002, treatment 3 of 17 (17.6%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 1.2.
improvement in SpO2 <5, 52.9% lower, RR 0.47, p = 0.05, treatment 8 of 17 (47.1%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 1.9.
improvement in SpO2 <6, 35.3% lower, RR 0.65, p = 0.27, treatment 11 of 17 (64.7%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 2.8.
improvement in SpO2 <7, 35.3% lower, RR 0.65, p = 0.27, treatment 11 of 17 (64.7%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 2.8.
improvement in SpO2 <8, 17.6% lower, RR 0.82, p = 1.00, treatment 14 of 17 (82.4%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 5.7.
improvement in SpO2 <9, 17.6% lower, RR 0.82, p = 1.00, treatment 14 of 17 (82.4%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 5.7.
improvement in SpO2 <10, 11.8% lower, RR 0.88, p = 1.00, treatment 15 of 17 (88.2%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 8.5.
improvement in SpO2 <11, 5.9% lower, RR 0.94, p = 1.00, treatment 16 of 17 (94.1%), control 5 of 5 (100.0%), NNT 17.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Dominguez-Nicolas et al., 25 May 2021, prospective, Mexico, peer-reviewed, 2 authors, LF-ThMS, trial NCT04895267 (history). Contact: eliasmanjarrez@gmail.com, elias.manjarrez@correo.buap.mx.
This PaperThermotherapyAll
Low-field thoracic magnetic stimulation increases peripheral oxygen saturation levels in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients: a single-blind, sham-controlled, crossover study
PhD Saul M Dominguez-Nicolas, PhD Elias Manjarrez
doi:10.1101/2021.05.21.21256456
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 may cause low oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and respiratory failure in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Hence, increased SpO 2 levels in COVID-19 patients could be crucial for their quality of life and recovery. This study aimed to demonstrate that a 30-minute single session of dorsal low-field thoracic magnetic stimulation (LF-ThMS) can be employed to increase SpO 2 levels in COVID-19 patients significantly. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the variables associated with LF-ThMS, such as frequency, magnetic flux density, and temperature in the dorsal thorax, might be correlated to SpO 2 levels in these patients. Here we employed an LF-ThMS device to noninvasively deliver a pulsed magnetic field from 100 to 118 Hz and 10.5 to 13.1 milliTesla (i.e., 105 to 131 Gauss) to the dorsal thorax. These values are within the intensity range of several pulsed electromagnetic field devices employed in physical therapy worldwide. We designed a single-blind, sham-controlled, crossover study on 5 COVID-19 patients who underwent 2 sessions of the study (real and sham LF-ThMS) and 12 patients who underwent only the real LF-ThMS. We found a statistically significant positive correlation between magnetic flux density, frequency, or temperature, associated with the real LF-ThMS and SpO 2 levels in all COVID-19 patients. However, the 5 patients in the sham-controlled study did not exhibit a significant change in their SpO 2 levels during sham stimulation. The employed frequencies and magnetic flux densities were safe for the patients. We did not observe adverse events after the LF-ThMS intervention. This study is a proof-of-concept that a single session of LF-ThMS applied for 30 minutes to the dorsal thorax of 17 COVID-19 patients significantly increased their SpO 2 levels. However, future research will be needed to understand the physiological mechanisms behind this finding. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT04895267, registered on May 20, 2021
Author contributions SMDN conceived the therapeutic application of magnetic stimuli in COVID-19 patients, developed the first LF-ThMS prototype, and performed the experiments. EM and SMDN conceived the proof-of-concept and hypothesis of this study. SMDN and EM performed the data analysis. EM designed the single-blind, shamcontrolled, crossover study on 5 COVID-19 patients, wrote the paper, and contributed to calibrate and improve the safeness of the original LF-ThMS prototype.
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Late treatment
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