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0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Case -12% Improvement Relative Risk c19early.org/z Adrean et al. Zinc for COVID-19 Prophylaxis Does zinc reduce COVID-19 infections? Retrospective 8,426 patients in the USA (April 2020 - April 2021) No significant difference in cases Adrean et al., Cureus, doi:10.7759/cureus.30881 Favors zinc Favors control
Does Prophylactic Oral Zinc Reduce the Risk of Contracting COVID-19?
Adrean et al., Cureus, doi:10.7759/cureus.30881
Adrean et al., Does Prophylactic Oral Zinc Reduce the Risk of Contracting COVID-19?, Cureus, doi:10.7759/cureus.30881
Oct 2022   Source   PDF  
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Retrospective 8,426 patients in the USA, showing no significant difference in cases with zinc prophylaxis. Severity results were not reported due to the small number of events.
risk of case, 12.2% higher, RR 1.12, p = 0.58, treatment 30 of 2,111 (1.4%), control 80 of 6,315 (1.3%).
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Adrean et al., 30 Oct 2022, retrospective, USA, peer-reviewed, survey, 6 authors, study period 1 April, 2020 - 9 April, 2021.
Contact: seadrean@yahoo.com.
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Does Prophylactic Oral Zinc Reduce the Risk of Contracting COVID-19?
Sean D Adrean, Kenneth Schmitt, Caleb Ng, Ash Pirouz, Hema L Ramkumar, Scott Grant
Cureus, doi:10.7759/cureus.30881
In this study, we aimed to investigate whether zinc provided in Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) vitamins is associated with a decreased risk of contracting coronavirus disease 2019 . Materials and methods We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study involving patients at a retina-only practice who were provided a questionnaire at each visit to assess whether they were symptomatic of or had contracted COVID-19. Those who answered yes to testing positive for COVID-19 were retrospectively analyzed and categorized based on their AREDS2 vitamin use, and a Pearson's chi-squared test was performed. Demographic data and past ocular history were also analyzed. Results A total of 8,426 unique patients, including 2,111 with a diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), were seen from April 1, 2020, to April 9, 2021. A total of 110 patients (1.3%) reported contracting COVID-19 and had positive COVID-19 tests. The average age of those who had contracted COVID-19 in this study was 68.3 years; 51.8% were male, 30.1% had AMD, 28.2% had diabetic retinopathy, 24.5% had surgical retinal disease, 11.8% had retinal vascular disease, and 4.5% had other disease states. Of the COVID-19positive patients, 27.3% (30/110) took AREDS2 vitamins, while 72.7% (80/110) patients did not. A chisquared analysis was performed, which was not statistically significant (p=0.667). Conclusions Oral zinc supplementation, in the form of AREDS2 vitamins, is not associated with a protective effect against contracting COVID-19.
Conclusions Oral zinc supplementation has been widely purported to reduce symptomatic viral days. It has also been recommended to be used as a prophylaxis for viral infections. It has been speculated that it may help reduce the chance of contracting COVID-19. Zinc is readily available over the counter and is used in the AREDS supplements for macular degeneration. Elderly patients are at increased risk of complications from COVID-19, and hence if zinc supplementation could reduce the chance of contracting COVID-19, that would be highly beneficial. However, based on our findings, oral zinc supplementation in the form of AREDS2 vitamins is not associated with a protective effect against contracting COVID-19. Appendices
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