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Effects of Metformin, Insulin on Hematological Parameters of COVID-19 Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

Petakh et al., Medical Archives, doi:10.5455/medarh.2022.76.329-332
Oct 2022  
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Metformin for COVID-19
3rd treatment shown to reduce risk in July 2020
 
*, now known with p < 0.00000000001 from 89 studies.
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4,100+ studies for 60+ treatments. c19early.org
Analysis of hematologic parameters in COVID-19 patients with diabetes in Ukraine, showing significantly lower CRP for patients taking metformin.
Petakh et al., 1 Oct 2022, retrospective, Ukraine, peer-reviewed, median age 62.7, 6 authors, study period January 2022 - March 2022.
This PaperMetforminAll
Effects of Metformin, Insulin on Hematological Parameters of COVID-19 Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
MD. Pavlo Petakh, Vasilij Griga, Issah Bin Mohammed, Kateryna Loshak, Ivan Poliak, Aleksandr Kamyshnyiy
Medical Archives, doi:10.5455/medarh.2022.76.329-332
Background: COVID-19 infection caused by SARS-COV-2 can result in multi-organ injuries and significant mortality in severe and critical patients, particularly those with type 2 diabetes as a comorbidity. Metformin and insulin are the main diabetes medications that affect the outcome of patients with COVID-19. Objective: The purpose of our study was to find out the features of the hematological indicators of patients with COVID-19 patients and type 2 diabetes. Methods: This is a retrospective study of the hospital confirmed COVID-19 patients between January to March 2022, who were admitted to Transcarpathian Regional Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital (Uzhhorod, Ukraine). Results: The effect of type 2 diabetes, metformin, and insulin on COVID-19 were analyzed, respectively. Demographics and blood laboratory indices were collected. In patients who took metformin, the level of CRP was significantly lower than in patients who did not take metformin (24 mg/L [IQR 15 -58] vs 52 mg/L, [IQR 22-121], P = 0.046). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pre-admission metformin use may benefit COVID-19 patients with type 2 diabetes.
References
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